12.14.2005

How long it has been

I can hardly form a sentence. I won't even try to complete sophisticated paragraphs. I hope nobody minds. If I hold myself to that standard, this post won't get done.

Buying a house is an insane process. I commented many times throughout that I couldn't believe this is how it actually works. It feels in some sense like the honor code at work. You sign hundreds of pieces of paper, many of which are almost illegible due to overfaxing/photocopying, agreeing to complex and consequential demands and legal requirements, accepting liability for hundreds of thousands of dollars, using only your scribble of a signature, or even your initials. It would be so easy to play dumb... "You can't prove it was I who initialed it!" or "I checked the 'don't know' box—I didn't know anything about that!" And I'm sure many people do rely on those shifty, fallback positions. Which leads to litigation, betrayal, arbitration...all those things so often lamented in today's world. We, however, were honorable buyers, and we read everything really thoroughly and had lawyers look over questionable documents and only agreed to things that made sense and blah blah blah. We're not so sure about the sellers, but hey, the deal's done, so at this point everything is simply a lesson learned, and those are valuable.

Throughout much of the process, my only comfort was the knowledge that so many others had trod this path before. They hadn't necessarily done it during the biggest real estate bubble in history, or in a USGS-certified liquefaction zone in San Francisco. They hadn't necessarily bought 125-year-old Victorian houses. With partners. In a building that they may have loved despite its many proverbial warts. But I knew that everyone's housing deal has its own distinct characteristics that rank it among the scariest things that person has ever done, and knowing that they survived made it easier for me to believe that I, too, would survive.

So, the house is now in our names, and I'm a San Francisco property owner, for better and worse. It's truly thrilling. I love our home, especially now that we figured out our heat actually works. Owning an old home, I can already tell, is a huge adventure. We had to jump through a few (copper pipe) hoops to get our laundry hookups installed, but they're now there, and...

....CAN I GET A DRUMROLL PLEASE?!....

....Yesterday, OMFG, we bought brand new washing machines that will be delivered sometime tomorrow. If you read a certain recent post, you know exactly how immeasurably exciting that is for me.

4 comments:

jfh said...

Hooray! Congratulations on your new status as Homeowner. I'm proud of you for having survived the whole process in one piece. love, tutu

Mary Tsao said...

A house *and* a washing machine! You're moving on up! To the big time!

Can't wait to see how you've decked the place out...

ann said...

Woo hoo!

Congratulations :)

Jennifer said...

The machines arrived yesterday and I did a bunch of laundry. I'm altogether giddy. When I woke up this morning, I sprinted over to the service porch to admire them. It's a sensation I haven't felt since I was a kid waking up on Christmas morning... I know that's a cliché, but it so accurately describes my feelings I have to use it!